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Page en cours de traduction depuis en:q:Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama. --Rédacteur Tibet (d)


Tenzin Gyatso, le 14e Dalai Lama (né le 6 juillet 1935) est le chef d'État et le chef spirituel du peuple tibétain; il a reçu le prix Nobel de la paix en 1989. Né Lhamo Dhondrub, renommé Jetsun Jamphel Ngawang Lobsang Yeshe Tenzin Gyatso (Saint Seigneur, Douce Gloire, Compassionné, Défenseur de la Foi, Océan de Sagesse) après avoir été reconnu officiellement comme la réincarnation du 13e Dalaï Lama. Les Tibétains se réfèrent habituellement au Dalaï Lama par Yeshe Norbu (Joyau Accompli), Kundun (la Présence), ou bien encore «  Gyalwa Rinpoché ».

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The Great Vehicle path requires the vast motivation of a Bodhisattva, who, not seeking just his or her welfare, takes on the burden of bringing about the welfare of all sentient beings.
  • La bonté est ma vraie religion.
    • Kindness, Clarity, and Insight (1984)
    • Variant: Ma religion est très simple. Ma religion est la bonté.
      • As quoted in Tibet, a Guide to the Land of Fascination (1988) by Trilok Chandra Majupuria and Indra Majupuria
  • It is very important to generate a good attitude, a good heart, as much as possible. From this, happiness in both the short term and the long term for both yourself and others will come.
    • Kindness, Clarity, and Insight (1984)
  • Religion does not mean just precepts, a temple, monastery, or other external signs, for these as well as hearing and thinking are subsidiary factors in taming the mind. When the mind becomes the practices, one is a practitioner of religion, and when the mind does not become the practices one is not.
Je suis juste un simple moine bouddhiste — pas plus, ni moins.
  • What is the Great Vehicle? What is the mode of procedure of the Bodhisattva path? We begin with the topic of the altruistic intention to achieve enlightenment in which one values others more than oneself. The Great Vehicle path requires the vast motivation of a Bodhisattva, who, not seeking just his or her welfare, takes on the burden of bringing about the welfare of all sentient beings. When a person generate this attitude, they enter within the Great Vehicle, and as long as it has not been generated, one cannot be counted among those of the Great Vehicle. This attitude really has great power; it, of course, is helpful for people practicing religion, but it also is helpful for those who are just concerned with the affairs of this lifetime. The root of happiness is altruism — the wish to be of service to others.
    • The Dalai Lama at Harvard: Lectures on the Buddhist Path to Peace (1988) by Jeffrey Hopkins
  • I feel that the essence of spiritual practice is your attitude toward others. When you have a pure, sincere motivation, then you have right attitude toward others based on kindness, compassion, love and respect. Practice brings the clear realisation of the oneness of all human beings and the importance of others benefiting by your actions.
    • Answering the question "Your Holiness, there are many people in the West who want to combine their spiritual practice with social and political responsibility. Do you feel that these two aspects are connected?" in an interview with Catherine Ingram, Dharamsala, India (2 November 1988).
I believe that in the 20th century, humanity has learned from many, many experiences. Some positive, and many negative...
  • It is the enemy who can truly teach us to practice the virtues of compassion and tolerance.
    • Ocean of Wisdom: Guidelines for Living (1989) ISBN 094066609X
    • Unsourced variant: In the practice of tolerance, one's enemy is the best teacher.
  • Dr. Rajendra Prasad was a true Bodhisatva. His humility brought tears to my eyes.
    • Freedom in Exile: The Autobiography of the Dalai Lama (1991)
Bodhicitta is the medicine which revives and gives life to every sentient being who even hears of it.
  • Don't compare me with Jesus. He is a great master, a great master...
    • Interview in The New York Times (28 November 1993)
  • I believe that in the 20th century, humanity has learned from many, many experiences. Some positive, and many negative. What misery, what destruction! The greatest number of human beings were killed in the two world wars of this century. But human nature is such that when we face a tremendous critical situation, the human mind can wake up and find some other alternative. That is a human capacity.
    • Interview in The New York Times (28 November 1993)
  • Reason well from the beginning and then there will never be any need to look back with confusion and doubt.
  • Human happiness and human satisfaction must ultimately come from within oneself. It is wrong to expect some final satisfaction to come from money or from a computer.
    • The Path to Tranquility: Daily Wisdom (1998) edited by Renuka Singh
  • Bodhicitta is the medicine which revives and gives life to every sentient being who even hears of it. When you engage in fulfilling the needs of others, your own needs are fulfilled as a by-product.
    • The Path to Tranquility: Daily Wisdom (1998) edited by Renuka Singh


  • It is also possible within this lifetime to enhance the power of the mind, enabling one to reaccess memories from previous lives. Such recollection tends to be more accessible during meditative experiences in the dream state. Once one has accessed memories of previous lives in the dream state, one gradually recalls them in the waking state.
    • Consciousness at the Crossroads: Conversations with The Dalai Lama on Brain Science and Buddhism (1999) ISBN 1559391278
  • If there is love, there is hope that one may have real families, real brotherhood, real equanimity, real peace. If the love within your mind is lost and you see other beings as enemies, then no matter how much knowledge or education or material comfort you have, only suffering and confusion will ensue
  • If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.
    • As quoted in Meditations for Living In Balance: Daily Solutions for People Who Do Too Much (2000) by Anne Wilson Schaef, p. 11
  • Within the body there are billions of different particles. Similarly, there are many different thoughts and a variety of states of mind. It is wise to take a close look into the world of your mind and to make the distinction between beneficial and harmful states of mind. Once you can recognize the value of good states of mind, you can increase or foster them.
    • The Dalai Lama's Book of Wisdom (2000)
True compassion is not just an emotional response but a firm commitment founded on reason...


All living beings are believed to possess the nature of the Primordial Buddha Samantabhadra, the potential or seed of enlightenment, within them.
  • According to Buddhism, individuals are masters of their own destiny. And all living beings are believed to possess the nature of the Primordial Buddha Samantabhadra, the potential or seed of enlightenment, within them. So our future is in our own hands. What greater free will do we need?
    • Answering the question: "Do sentient beings have free will?" in Dzogchen : The Heart Essence of the Great Perfection (2001) ISBN 155939157X
As in science so in Buddhism, understanding the nature of reality is pursued by means of critical investigation...
  • We need a little more compassion, and if we cannot have it then no politician or even a magician can save the planet.
    • As quoted in Words Of Wisdom: Selected Quotes by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (2001) edited by Margaret Gee, p. 49
  • Compassion and tolerance are not a sign of weakness, but a sign of strength.
    • As quoted in Words Of Wisdom: Selected Quotes by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (2001) edited by Margaret Gee, p. 71
  • Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.
    • As quoted in A Small Drop of Ink: A Collection of Inspirational and Moving Quotations of the Ages (2003) by Linda Pendleton
  • My confidence in venturing into science lies in my basic belief that as in science so in Buddhism, understanding the nature of reality is pursued by means of critical investigation: if scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims.
    • The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality (2005)
  • If science proves some belief of Buddhism wrong, then Buddhism will have to change. In my view, science and Buddhism share a search for the truth and for understanding reality. By learning from science about aspects of reality where its understanding may be more advanced, I believe that Buddhism enriches its own worldview.
    • The New York Times (12 November 2005)
All major religious traditions carry basically the same message, that is love, compassion and forgiveness... the important thing is they should be part of our daily lives.
  • All major religious traditions carry basically the same message, that is love, compassion and forgiveness ... the important thing is they should be part of our daily lives.
    • As quoted in Especially for Christians: Powerful Thought-provoking Words from the Past (2005) by Mark Alton Rose, p. 19
The time has come to educate people, to cease all quarrels in the name of religion, culture, countries, different political or economic systems...
  • His Holiness Pope John Paul II was a man I held in high regard. His experience in Poland and my own difficulties with communists gave us an immediate ground.
    The Pope was very sympathetic to the Tibetan problem. Of course, as the head of an institution trying to establish good relations with China and seriously concerned about the status of millions of Christians in china he could not express this publicly or officially. But right from the start of our friendship he revealed to me privately that he had a clear understanding of the Tibetan problem because of his own experience of communism in Poland. This gave me great personal encouragement.
  • Media people should have long noses like an elephant to smell out politicians, mayors, prime ministers and businessmen. We need to know the reality, the good and the bad, not just the appearance.
  • The time has come to educate people, to cease all quarrels in the name of religion, culture, countries, different political or economic systems. Fighting is useless. Suicide.
    • News conference in Vancouver, B.C. as quoted in The Globe and Mail. (8 September 2006)

Letter to Deng Xiaoping (1981)[modifier | modifier le code]

Letter to Deng Xiaoping (23 March 1981) Full text online
  • I agree with and believe in the Communist ideology which seeks the well being of human beings in general and the proletariat in particular, and in Lenin's policy of the equality of nationalities. Similarly, I was pleased with the discussions I had with Chairman Mao on ideology and the policy towards nationalities.
    If that same ideology and policy were implemented it would have brought much admiration and happiness. However, if one is to make a general comment on the developments during the past two decades, there has been a lapse in economic and educational progress, the basis of human happiness. Moreover, on account of the hardships caused by the unbearable disruptions, there has been a loss of trust between the Party and the masses, between the officials and the masses, among the officials themselves, and also among the masses themselves.
    By deceiving one another through false assumptions and misrepresentations there has been, in reality, a great lapse and delay in achieving the real goals.
  • It is regrettable that some Tibetan officials, who lack the wisdom and competence required for promoting basic human happiness and the short and long term welfare of their own people, indulge in flattering Chinese officials and, collaborate with these Chinese officials who know nothing about Tibetans and work simply for their temporary fame indulging in fabricating impressive reports. In reality, the Tibetan people have not only undergone immeasurable sufferings, but large numbers have also unnecessarily lost their lives.
  • On the political front, we have always pursued the path of truth and justice in our struggle for the legitimate rights of the Tibetan people. We have never indulged in distortions, exaggerations and criticism of the Chinese people. Neither have we harboured any ill will towards them. Above all, we have always held to our position of truth and justice without siding with any of the international political power blocks.
  • We must improve the relationship between China and Tibet as well as between Tibetans in and outside Tibet. With truth and equality as our foundation, we must try to develop friendship between Tibetans and Chinese through better understanding in the future. The time has come to apply our common wisdom in a spirit of tolerance and broadmindedness to achieve genuine happiness for the Tibetan people with a sense of urgency.
    On my part, I remain committed to contribute my efforts for the welfare of all human beings, and in particular the poor and the weak to the best of my ability without any distinction based on national boundaries.

Discours d'acceptation du prix Nobel de la Paix (1989)[modifier | modifier le code]

Discours d'acceptation du prix Nobel de la Paix (10 décembre 1989) Full text online
I am convinced that everyone can develop a good heart and a sense of universal responsibility with or without religion.
  • I believe all suffering is caused by ignorance. People inflict pain on others in the selfish pursuit of their happiness or satisfaction. Yet true happiness comes from a sense of inner peace and contentment, which in turn must be achieved through the cultivation of altruism, of love and compassion and elimination of ignorance, selfishness and greed.
    The problems we face today, violent conflicts, destruction of nature, poverty, hunger, and so on, are human-created problems which can be resolved through human effort, understanding and the development of a sense of brotherhood and sisterhood. We need to cultivate a universal responsibility for one another and the planet we share. Although I have found my own Buddhist religion helpful in generating love and compassion, even for those we consider our enemies, I am convinced that everyone can develop a good heart and a sense of universal responsibility with or without religion.
Je suis optimiste quant aux anciennes valeurs qui ont nourri l’humanité réaffirmées aujourd’hui pour nous préparer à un XXIe siècle meilleur et plus heureux.
  • With the ever-growing impact of science on our lives, religion and spirituality have a greater role to play by reminding us of our humanity. There is no contradiction between the two. Each gives us valuable insights into the other. Both science and the teachings of the Buddha tell us of the fundamental unity of all things. This understanding is crucial if we are to take positive and decisive action on the pressing global concern with the environment. I believe all religions pursue the same goals, that of cultivating human goodness and bringing happiness to all human beings. Though the means might appear different the ends are the same.
  • Au moment où nous entrons dans la dernière décennie de ce siècle, je suis optimiste quant aux anciennes valeurs qui ont nourri l’humanité réaffirmées aujourd’hui pour nous préparer à un XXIe siècle meilleur et plus heureux.
    Je prie pour nous tous, oppresseurs et amis, pour qu’ensemble nous réussissions à construire un monde meilleur par la compréhension et l’amour et que, ce faisant, nous puissions alléger la douleur et la souffrance de tous les êtres sensibles.

Discours du Prix Nobel de la Paix (1989)[modifier | modifier le code]

Discours du Prix Nobel de la Paix (11 décembre 1989) Full text online(http://www.tibetan.fr/?Discours-du-Prix-Nobel-de-la-Paix)
Du fait que nous partageons cette petite planète qu’est la terre, nous devons apprendre à vivre en paix et en harmonie les uns avec les autres, et avec la nature. Ce n’est pas seulement un rêve, c’est une nécessité.
  • Lorsque je rencontre des gens venant de différentes parties du monde, je constate immanquablement que nous sommes, au fond, tous semblables : nous sommes tous des êtres humains. Nous pouvons être vêtus différemment, avoir une couleur de peau différente, parler des langues différentes. Voilà pour les apparences. Mais fondamentalement, nous sommes tous les mêmes êtres humains. C’est cela qui nous lie les uns aux autres, qui nous permet de nous comprendre, de devenir des amis, de nous sentir proches les uns des autres.
  • Du fait que nous partageons cette petite planète qu’est la terre, nous devons apprendre à vivre en paix et en harmonie les uns avec les autres, et avec la nature. Ce n’est pas seulement un rêve, c’est une nécessité. Nous dépendons les uns des autres à tant de titres que nous ne pouvons plus vivre en communautés isolées et ignorer ce qui se passe hors de chez nous. Nous devons nous entr’aider en cas de difficultés, et nous devons partager les avantages qui nous échoient
La paix intérieure, voilà la clef : Si vous possédez cette paix intérieure, les problèmes extérieurs n’entameront pas votre sens profond de sérénité et de paix.
  • Ce n’est ni la colère ni la haine de ceux qui sont responsables des souffrances immenses imposées à notre peuple, de la destruction de notre pays, de l’anéantissement de notre culture, qui me poussent à parler. Ceux-là aussi sont des êtres humains qui luttent pour trouver le bonheur, et ils ont droit à notre compassion. Mais je veux vous mettre an courant de la situation dramatique qui caractérise aujourd’hui mon pays et de l’espoir qui anime mon peuple, car dans notre lutte pour la liberté, la vérité est la seule arme dont nous disposions.
  • Nous formons aujourd’hui une grande famille. Ce qui se produit à tel endroit de la planète nous atteint tous. Et bien entendu, pas uniquement quand il s’agit d’événements malheureux, mais également d’événements heureux. Non seulement sommes-nous au courant de ce qui se passe ailleurs, grâce aux extraordinaires moyens de communication modernes, mais de plus, nous sommes directement atteints par des événements qui se produisent au loin.
  • Notre sécurité est renforcée quand la paix est rétablie entre deux pays d’un autre continent qui étaient en guerre.
    Pourtant, guerre et paix, destruction ou protection de la nature, violation ou défense des droits de l’homme et des libertés démocratiques, misère ou bien-être matériel, existence ou non de valeurs morales et spirituelles, compréhension ou non à l’égard d’autrui ne constituent pas des phénomènes isolés que l’on peut analyser et aborder séparément les uns des autres. Ils sont en fait interdépendants, à tous les niveaux, et doivent être compris dans cette optique complémentaire.
  • La paix ne peut s’installer de façon durable que là où les droits de l’homme sont respectés, où les gens ont de quoi manger, où individus et nations sont libres. Or la véritable paix avec soi-même et avec le monde n’est réalisable que par la paix de l’esprit.
  • La paix intérieure, voilà la clef : Si vous possédez cette paix intérieure, les problèmes extérieurs n’entameront pas votre sens profond de sérénité et de paix. Un tel état d’esprit permet d’aborder n’importe quelle situation avec calme et modération, tout en préservant son bonheur intérieur. Voilà ce qui est important. Quelle que soit votre aisance matérielle, sans cette paix intérieure les circonstances peuvent encore et toujours vous inquiéter, vous troubler ou vous rendre malheureux.
  • Cette responsabilité ne revient pas uniquement aux dirigeants de nos pays ou à ceux que nous avons désignés ou élus pour assumer telle ou telle fonction. Elle revient à chacun de nous, individuellement.
Je souhaite saisir cette occasion pour expliquer ce que l’on entend par zone d’Ahimsa ou par refuge de la paix...
  • Je suis profondément touché par l’inquiétude que ressentent sincèrement tant de personnes dans cette partie du monde pour les souffrances du peuple tibétain. C’est là une source d’espoir, non seulement pour nous Tibétains, mais pour tous les opprimés.
  • Je souhaite saisir cette occasion pour expliquer ce que l’on entend par zone d’Ahimsa ou par refuge de la paix, cette notion étant la clef de voûte du Plan en cinq points. Je suis convaincu qu’elle sera de la plus grande importance, non seulement pour le Tibet, maïs pour la paix et la stabilité en Asie.
    Mon rêve serait que le plateau tibétain devienne un refuge de liberté où les hommes pourraient vivre en paix et en harmonie avec la nature.
  • Voici quels sont les éléments essentiels pour instaurer la zone d’Ahimsa proposée :
  • le plateau tibétain serait démilitarisé ;
  • la fabrication, le stockage et les essais nucléaires y seraient interdits ;
  • le plateau tibétain serait transformé en une biosphère, il deviendrait le plus grand parc naturel du monde. Des lois rigides seraient appliquées pour en protéger la faune et la flore. L’exploitation des ressources naturelles serait soigneusement réglementée afin de ne pas causer de dommages aux écosystèmes ; une politique de développement durable serait adoptée pour les régions habitées ;
  • la production et l’utilisation de l’énergie nucléaire, ou d’autres technologies qui entraînent des déchets dangereux seraient interdites ;
  • la politique et la gestion des ressources naturelles consisteraient à promouvoir la paix et la protection de l’environnement. Les organisations qui auraient pour objectif de défendre la paix et de protéger la vie sous toutes ses formes seraient les bienvenues au Tibet ;
  • l’établissement au Tibet d’organisations régionales et internationales pour la défense et la protections des droits de l’homme serait encouragée.
Fichier:Tmava hmota (Darkmatter).jpg
Aussi longtemps que persistera l’espace, aussi longtemps que subsisteront les êtres vivants, que je puisse moi aussi demeurer pour dissiper la souffrance du monde.
  • Pour assurer la paix et la stabilité en Asie, il est indispensable de créer des zones de paix pour séparer les grandes puissances du continent, qui sont des adversaires potentiels.
  • Quand je me suis rendu au Costa Rica au début de 1989, j’ai eu l’occasion de constater qu’un pays peut se développer avec succès sans armée, et devenir une démocratie stable, engagée à maintenir la paix et à protéger la nature. Ceci me conforte dans ma conviction que ma façon de concevoir l’avenir du Tibet n’est pas seulement un rêve, mais bien un projet réalisable.
  • Je crois que notre capacité toute tibétaine de combiner les qualités spirituelles avec une attitude réaliste et pragmatique nous permettra d’apporter une contribution originale, à notre façon, si modeste soit-elle. C’est l’espoir qui est le mien ; c’est ce pourquoi je prie.
    Pour conclure, j’aimerais faire ici avec vous, une courte prière. Elle est pour moi une source d’inspiration et de détermination :
Aussi longtemps que persistera l’espace,
Aussi longtemps que subsisteront les êtres vivants,
Que je puisse moi aussi demeurer
Pour dissiper la souffrance du monde.

The Dalai Lama: A Policy of Kindness (1990)[modifier | modifier le code]

The Dalai Lama, A Policy of Kindness: An Anthology by and about the Dalai Lama (1990) edited by Sidney Piburn ISBN 8120815122
An old day passes, a new day arrives. The important thing is to make it meaningful...
  • Old friends pass away, new friends appear. It is just like the days. An old day passes, a new day arrives. The important thing is to make it meaningful: a meaningful friend — or a meaningful day.
    • As quoted in "Tibet's Living Buddha" by Pico Iyer, p. 32
  • Whether one believes in a religion or not, and whether one believes in rebirth or not, there isn't anyone who doesn't appreciate kindness and compassion.
    • "Kindness and Compassion" p. 47
  • If I say, "I am a monk." or "I am a Buddhist," these are, in comparison to my nature as a human being, temporary. To be human is basic.
    • "Kindness and Compassion" p. 47
  • Today we face many problems. Some are created essentially by ourselves based on divisions due to ideology, religion, race, economic status, or other factors. Therefore, the time has come for us to think on a deeper level, on the human level, and from that level we should appreciate and respect the sameness of others as human beings.
    • "Kindness and Compassion" p. 47
  • This is my simple religion. There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.
    • "Kindness and Compassion" p. 52
To study Buddhism and then use it as a weapon in order to criticize others' theories or ideologies is wrong. The very purpose of religion is to control yourself, not to criticize others.
  • To study Buddhism and then use it as a weapon in order to criticize others' theories or ideologies is wrong. The very purpose of religion is to control yourself, not to criticize others. Rather, we must criticize ourselves. How much am I doing about my anger? About my attachment, about my hatred, about my pride, my jealousy? These are the things which we must check in daily life with the knowledge of the Buddhist teachings.
    • "A Talk to Western Buddhists" p. 87
  • As Buddhists, while we practice our own teaching, we must respect other faiths, Christianity, Judaism and so forth. We must recognize and appreciate their contributions over many past centuries to human society, and at this time we must strive to make common effort to serve humankind.
    • "A Talk to Western Buddhists" p. 87
  • Sectarian feelings and criticism of other teachings or other sects is very bad, poisonous, and should be avoided.
    • "A Talk to Western Buddhists" p. 87
  • It is necessary to help others, not only in our prayers, but in our daily lives. If we find we cannot help others, the least we can do is to desist from harming them.
    • "A Talk to Western Buddhists" p. 89


  • If there are sound reasons or bases for the points you demand, then there is no need for violence. On the other hand, when there is no sound reason that concessions should be made to you but mainly your own desire, then reason cannot work and you have to rely on force. Thus using force is not a sign of strength but rather a sign of weakness.
    • "The Nobel Evening Address" p. 115
  • As a result of more contact with people from other traditions, as time passes I have firmed my conviction that all religions can work together despite fundamental differences in philosophy. Every religion aims at serving humanity. Therefore, it is possible for the various religions to work together to serve humanity and contribute to world peace. So, during these last few years, at every opportunity I try to develop closer relations with other religions.
    • "The Nobel Evening Address" p. 115
  • Buddhism does not accept a theory of God, or a creator. According to Buddhism, one's own actions are the creator, ultimately. Some people say that, from a certain angle, Buddhism is not a religion but rather a science of mind. Religion has much involvement with faith. Sometimes it seems that there is quite a distance between a way of thinking based on faith and one entirely based on experiment, remaining skeptical. Unless you find something through investigation, you do not want to accept it as fact. From one viewpoint, Buddhism is a religion, from another viewpoint Buddhism is a science of mind and not a religion. Buddhism can be a bridge between these two sides. Therefore, with this conviction I try to have closer ties with scientists, mainly in the fields of cosmology, psychology, neurobiology and physics. In these fields there are insights to share, and to a certain extent we can work together.
    • "The Nobel Evening Address" p. 115

Daily Telegraph interview (2006)[modifier | modifier le code]

"Westerners are too self-absorbed" by Alice Thomson, in The Daily Telegraph (1 March 2006)
  • In the West, you have bigger homes, yet smaller families; you have endless conveniences — yet you never seem to have any time. You can travel anywhere in the world, yet you don’t bother to cross the road to meet your neighbours.
  • Some say I am a good person, some say I am a charlatan — I am just a monk... I never asked people like Richard Gere to come, but it is foolish to stop them. I have Tibetans, Indians, backpackers, Aids patients, religious people, politicians, actors and princesses. My attitude is to give everyone some of my time. If I can contribute in any way to their happiness, that makes me happy.
  • I don't want to convert people to Buddhism — all major religions, when understood properly, have the same potential for good.
  • Fundamentalism is terrifying because it is based purely on emotion, rather than intelligence. It prevents followers from thinking as individuals and about the good of the world.

Misattributed[modifier | modifier le code]

Instructions for Life[modifier | modifier le code]

These statements were falsely attributed to the Dalai Lama in an email hoax. They actually derive from advice in Life's Little Instruction Book: 511 suggestions, observations, and reminders on how to live a happy and rewarding life (1991) by H. Jackson Brown, Jr; More information is available on the hoax at Snopes.com
  1. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.
  2. When you lose, don't lose the lesson.
  3. Follow the three Rs: Respect for self, Respect for others and Responsibility for all your actions.
  4. Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.
  5. Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly.
  6. Don't let a little dispute injure a great friendship.
  7. When you realize you've made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.
  8. Spend some time alone every day.
  9. Open your arms to change, but don't let go of your values.
  10. Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.
  11. Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll be able to enjoy it a second time.
  12. In disagreements with loved ones, deal only with the current situation. Don't bring up the past.
  13. Share your knowledge. It's a way to achieve immortality.
  14. Be gentle with the earth.
  15. Once a year, go someplace you've never been before.
  16. Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other.
  17. Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.
  18. Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon.

Quotes about the 14th Dalai Lama[modifier | modifier le code]

In awarding the Peace Prize to H.H. the Dalai Lama we affirm our unstinting support for his work for peace, and for the unarmed masses on the march in many lands for liberty, peace and human dignity. ~ Egil Aarvik, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee
  • The Dalai Lama in his struggle for the liberation of Tibet consistently has opposed the use of violence. He has instead advocated peaceful solutions based upon tolerance and mutual respect in order to preserve the historical and cultural heritage of his people.
    The Dalai Lama has developed his philosophy of peace from a great reverence for all things living and upon the concept of universal responsibility embracing all mankind as well as nature.
  • The world has shrunk. Increasingly peoples and nations have grown dependent on one another. No one can any longer act entirely in his own interest. It is therefore imperative that we should accept mutual responsibility for all political, economic, and ecological problems.
    In view of this, fewer and fewer people would venture to dismiss the Dalai Lama's philosophy as utopian: on the contrary, one would be increasingly justified in asserting that his gospel of nonviolence is the truly realistic one, with most promise for the future. And this applies not only to Tibet but to each and every conflict. The future hopes of oppressed millions are today linked to the unarmed battalions, for they will win the peace: the justice of their demands, moreover, is now so clear and the normal strength of their struggle so indomitable that they can only temporarily be halted by force of arms.
    In awarding the Peace Prize to H.H. the Dalai Lama we affirm our unstinting support for his work for peace, and for the unarmed masses on the march in many lands for liberty, peace and human dignity.
  • There's no question that His Holiness is my root guru, and he's been quite tough with me at times. I've had to explain to people who sometimes have quite a romantic vision of His Holiness that at times he's been cross with me, but it was very skillful. At the moment he did it, I'm not saying it was pleasant for me, but there was no ego attachment from his side. I'm very thankful that he trusts me enough to be the mirror for me and not pull any punches. Mind you, the first meetings were not that way; I think he was aware how fragile I was and was being very careful. Now I think he senses that my seriousness about the teachings has increased and my own strength within the teachings has increased. He can be much tougher on me.
  • I found also that the question of His Holiness in terms of a political movement was very tricky. It's a non-violent movement, which is a problem in itself-you don't get headlines with nonviolence. And His Holiness doesn't see himself as Gandhi; he doesn't create dramatic, operatic situations.
    So we've ended up taking a much steadier kind of approach. It's not about drama. It's about, little by little, building truth, and I think it's probably been deeper because of that. The senators, congressmen, legislators and parliamentarians who have got involved go way beyond what they would normally give to a cause they believed in.
    • Richard Gere, in "My Journey as a Buddhist" an interview with Melvin McLeod in Shambhala Sun (May 1999)
  • I think the universality of His Holiness' words and teachings have made this so much bigger than just Tibet. When His Holiness won the Nobel Peace Prize, there was a quantum leap. He is not seen as solely a Tibetan anymore; he belongs to the world.
    • Richard Gere, in "My Journey as a Buddhist" an interview with Melvin McLeod in Shambhala Sun (May 1999)
  • His Holiness opposes violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation. He urges respect, tolerance, compassion and the full recognition of human rights for all.
    • Office of Tibet spokeswoman Dawa Tsering