Sonnet 99

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.
Aller à : navigation, rechercher

Sonnet 99

The forward violet thus did I chide:
Sweet thief, whence didst thou steal thy sweet that smells,
If not from my love's breath? Thy purple pride
Which on thy soft cheek for complexion dwells
In my love's veins thou hast too grossly dyed.
The lily I condemned for thy hand,
And buds of marjoram had stol'n thy hair:
The roses fearfully on thorns did stand,
One blushing shame, another white despair;
A third, nor red nor white, had stol'n of both
And to his robbery had annex'd thy breath;
But, for his theft, in pride of all his growth
A vengeful canker eat him up to death.
More flowers I noted, yet I none could see
But sweet or color it had stol'n from thee.

— William Shakespeare

Traduction de François-Victor Hugo

Le Sonnet 99 est l'un des 154 sonnets écrits par le dramaturge et poète William Shakespeare.

Avec ses quinze vers, il ne suit pas la structure habituelle du sonnet anglais. C'est le seul sonnet du recueil à compter plus de quatorze vers ; l'autre sonnet présentant un nombre inhabituel de vers, le 126, en compte seulement douze.

Notes et références[modifier | modifier le code]

Liens externes[modifier | modifier le code]

Sur les autres projets Wikimedia :