Sonnet 1

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Sonnet 1

From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory.
But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding.
    Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
    To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.

— William Shakespeare

Traduction de François-Victor Hugo

Sonnet 1 est l'un des 154 sonnets écrits par le dramaturge et poète William Shakespeare.

Texte original[modifier | modifier le code]

Texte et typographie originale, selon l’édition in-4° de 1609[1].

FRom faireſt creatures we deſire increaſe,
That thereby beauties Roſe might neuer die,
But as the riper ſhould by time deceaſe,
His tender heire might beare his memory:
But thou contracted to thine owne bright eyes,
Feed’ſt thy lights flame with ſelfe ſubſtantiall fewell,
Making a famine where aboundance lies,
Thy ſelfe thy foe,to thy ſweet ſelfe too cruell:
Thou that art now the worlds freſh ornament,
And only herauld to the gaudy ſpring,
Within thine owne bud burieſt thy content,
And tender chorle makſt waſt in niggarding:
   Pitty the world,or elſe this glutton be,
   To eate the worlds due,by the graue and thee.

Notes et références[modifier | modifier le code]

  1. (en) William Shakespeare et Hyder Edwards Rollins (éd.), The Sonnets, vol. 24, part I, Philadelphie et Londres, J. B. Lippincott Company,‎ 1944, 404 p., p. 5.

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